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Alumni - Schools & Such
WOW!
In such a short time I am finding myself rebuilding this project.  Small problems developed, such as links breaking and not loading properly.  To help solve this, I have divided schools into 3 separate projects, one for each school corporation in the county.  Union township schools were split into their current school district.  Below you will find a link for the boundary map based on the 2010 Census.  Also, A late 1800's map for finding old school locations.
This should allow adding more information.  For example, I am extracting information from Dr. Charles Arvin's Township school records.
We hope this can become a safe repository for tid-bits of school information everyone can share.  We can gladly accept stories and photos of your ancestor's schooling, to be easily shared with your cousins.
Many of the early small one room schools have have no lasting formal records.  They have been found by accident while researching other items.  We appreciate those researchers who have found them.
This update May 31, 2020
Jim


School Photos, Records and such!

(If you have any photos or records to add, please send them to me as an attachment Karen Zach)
Karen's Note: It is obvious some of these came from a book, but I have no clue what / where - I'm sorry :(  Of course, it's not a complete listing of everyone who went to school in Montgomery County, but it's a wow index nonetheless and has lots of goodies for ya'!). Thanks to all who have contributed information, pictures, identification help and locations!!!!!

NOTE: Since Bill Boone's Sectional basketball history includes many of the schools below -- CLICK above for BASKETBALL

Also Bill's Evolution of Girls' Basketball Uniforms & Evolution of Boy's Basketball Uniforms. Thanks agin for sharing your great knowledge, Bill

Teacher's License - OC McLOED (thanks Marty Mc for this - it's too awesome)

1836 School Tax notice (if someone really understands this, please explain it to me :) - Commissioner Ezekiel McConnell

ME Clodfelter
-- Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, Crawfordsville, Montgomery
County, Indiana 7 November 1874 p 1 Educational – ME Clodfelter, Superintendent of the Schools of Montgomery County. Office in rear of the Recorder’s Office in Union Block, Crawfordsville, Ind. Examination of applicants for teacher’s license takes place on the last Saturday of each month.

1953 - County Music Festival Program thanks to Bob H)


(August 28, 2020)
1874 County Teachers   listing with names and Post Office Address   Source: Saturday Evening Journal Sat Sept 5, 1874 p6

HISTORICAL INFORMATION about County the wide school system

COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS  Thanks to the collected works of Dr. Charles L. Arvin on the Monrgomery County Schools


Below is Karl Czerney James born 13 February 1880 - was County Superintendent for several years beginning about 1920 - would like to find more about him:




A rememberance of the 58 year (1891 - 1951) educational career of Mr. Dan W. Murphy.  "He taught at Kentwood, Center, Wingate, New Richmond, and Elmdale in Coal Creek Township.  In Brown Township he taught at the Durham and Browns Valley schools.  He was then appointed principal and teacher at Smartsburg in Inion township, and devoted 37 years of faithful and untiring service in this position." (exerted from book)

Thanks to Ed Watson for providing this history




Consolidation Boundaries  as of the 2010 Census

Dr. Charles Arvin  on the Schools of Montgomery County.  
He was Crawfordsville Administrator, Curriculum Coordinator
Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000






Scroll down to see the Crawfordsville Schools
OR !!!
Use the new Index to speed you down the page

A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M

N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U    V   W   X   Y   Z

We currently have no schools with "A", "D", "E", "G", "I", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "V", "X", "Y" or "Z"
In the Crawfordsville Scholl Corporation




 Beard School  aka: John Beard School



  Central School           

Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
The old Central High School Building was erected in 1873-73 at an approximate cost of forty-four thousand dollars.  In 1892 it was partly burned, and was rebuilt at an expense of thiry-five thousand dollars.  While the rebuilding was going on, students attended class some of the buildings on the Wabash campus.  After being remodeled, the building served as a high school until a new building was opened September 4, 1911  The cost of the new building was ninety-two thousand five hundred dollars.  Additional rooms and the gymnasium were added in 1941.  That building was then replaced with a new high school building at the southwest edge of Crawfordsville in August of 1993.
Education Important to Community
Although there had been several private schools in homes guring the 1860'\s, citizens felt a central school was needed to benefit all children in all grades.  In 1873 Central School was built on Jefferson Square, the square bounded by Jefferson, College, Seminary, and School Street.  It was estimated a million bricks would be used in the structure.
In 1892 a fire necessated renovation of the building.  In 1911 a new school was built on the site, which became Crawfordsville High School.  In 1914 it was remodeled to extend the wings, remove the tower, and plan for a large gymnasium and auditorium.  Work was started in 1919 on more classrooms and a 2,500 seat auditorium.  This enabled the 1921 graduating class to receive their diplomas from the stage of the new auditorium instead of exercises in Center Church, The Opera House or Music Hall as in the past.
The last addition to the high school was complete in 1941 as a WPA project.  It provided a gymnasium , eight new classrooms, shower rooms, and a new printing room in the basement.  The gym and classrooms were built on the south side of the building.When Central School was built in 1873 all students in all grades attended there.  As the school population increased with the town's growth, grade or ward schools were built to accomidate the children in various sections of the city.



(June 30, 2020)  COLORED  SCHOOL


Source: Crawfordsville Star 6 Sept 1877 p 6
Miss Roxie Hall, an educated colored lady of Indianapolis has been engaged by the trustees to teach the colored school in this city.


 County Seminary - 1836 article


 CRAWFORDSVILLE BUSINESS COLLEGE

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Review, Dec 22, 1910 p 4

Wanted - Every young person who expects to enter Business College, Jan 2, to call at once for particulars. Crawfordsville Business College, Charles E. Batchelor, Mgr.





  • Crawfordsville Community School Corporation History
  • The new 1910 building with the Dome of Central School still visable.  Also shown is a post card view after Central school is removed, but before the Auditorium and Gymnasium have been added.
  • The 1910 Building was used until 1993. Then was sold to a commercial enterprise.  It was converted into housing space and business offices.  An sports and exercise complex took over gymnasium and physical education facilities.  See the building exterior today, May 24, 2020 (photos taken by Jim Zach)
  • Besides the historical items below, you might also enjoy seeing the current site about CHS.  
  • CHS New building September 1993  from across the parking lot, Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000.  Plus a closer look at the entrance.  A view of the school receiving some mechcanical and security upgrades.
  • See also Bill Boone's (CHS) Sectional History - what FUN :)
  • 1919 - Girls to cook meals for factulty/pupils
    Source: Crawfordsville, Indiana Dec 9, 1919 p 3 The advanced domestic science girls will open a cafeteria lunch room Wednesday. All of the pupils and teachers are very glad for it is quite convenient for those who do not wish to go home for lunch.
  • 1926 Athenian -- Source: Crawfordsville Review Jan 26, 1926 p 1 -- About half of the photography which was to have been featured in the 1926 Athenian HS yearbook was destroyed by the fire which originated in Hirshburg's studio Friday night, according to statements made Monday by members of the HS publication's staff. A large number of prints had been sent to the engraver and those destroyed were to have been sent this week. 48 senior pictures, all of the faculty pictures, two title pages, three scenic pictures and a number of sport and organization prints were destroyed. Some of it cannot be replaced.
  • CHS Sports (Bill Boone's Great site)
  • Early Sports Players  looking for more photos!
  • CHS - gym  This photo shows the Girls Gym Class using the floor mentioned below:
    -- Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal 7 June 1919 Arrangements were completed today by which Crawfordsville HS will have a basketball floor in connection with the new auditorium now nearing completion according to an announcement made by officials of the Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce who have been instrumental in learning the matter about. The project has been under discussion for some time past but the necessity of raising the additional funds required when the expenditures on the school had already reached the legal limit, had prevented action sooner. At a recent meeting of the board of directors of the Chamber of Commerce it was decided to cooperate with the school board in attempting to find some means by which the funds could be raised. After conference with the contractor who is in charge of the erection of the auditorium it was found that the additional money required would amount to about $750 dollars and the directors agreed to sign a note for the necessary amount with the understanding that it should be repaid out of the first funds available. The installation of a basketball floor in the building will not necessitate any great alterations in the construction of the auditorium. It will mean that the levels of two doors must be changed and the stairways leading to the stage, slightly shifted. The basketball court will be laid over the present concrete floor and will be of matched maple 70 by 36'. The seating capacity of the auditorium when the basketball court (sorry, rest gone)
  • Opening Day 1954  (newspaper clipings probably "Journal-Review" Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
  • 1964-65 Administrators   Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000



Check out our Album of assorted photos below!
Just watch the self playing Album, see a collection of 11 photos.
Want to spend more time viewing?  On the "ControlBar" click the icon "[ ]" on the right hand edge, making it "Full Screen" and giving you control to go at your own pace or increasing size.  Enjoy!!

See our Collection of Athenian's below
Select your year and follow the link!



1938 Crawfordsville Athenian - thanks so very very much to Ron Vaught who so generously shared this great 1938 Crawfordsville High School yearbook with us - it belonged to his father, Wallace.

1939 Crawfordsville Athenian  -- thanks Cathy K for providing us with some C'ville memorabilia :)

1947 Crawfordsville Athenian  - thanks Cathy K for providing us with some C'ville memorabilia :)

1948 Crawfordsville Athenian  - thanks Cathy K for providing us with some C'ville memorabilia :)

1949 Crawfordsville Athenian  - thanks Cathy K for this one, too :)

1954 Crawfordsville Athenian  thanks Cathy K-- greatly appreciated

1964 Crawfordsville Athenian  - thanks Cathy K -- greatly appreciated
NOTE: An index begins below on page 101 - you might want to check that before going page by page :) kbz

1965 Crawfordsville Athenian  - - thanks so VERY much to Ron Vaught for scanning and sending this one


I have yet to scan 1918, 1921, 1924, 1925, 1929, 1930, 1934  Thanks to Sue Ann Ford




 Crawfordsville Middle School  (Active School Site)

Photos of CMS  May 25, 2020  by Jim Zach



 Fiskville School

Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
In 1910 two township schools --Highland and Fiskville -- were added to the city schools by annexation.  Fiskville Grade School was located on North Whitlock Avenue.  The Fiskville area was named for a Mr. Fisk who owned vast acreage to the north of Crawfordsville in the Sunrise Addition.  When the Fiskville School closed, students were transported to the Horace Mann School by bus, the first school bus in Crawfordsville.  The parents of the Fiskville students would not allow their children to walk to Horace Mann because that necessitated their walking across the Monon Railroad.
More:
Fiskville was another rural school and was added to the Crawfordsville School Corporation in 1910 because the city annexed the area.  It house the first four grades and had an enrollment of forty-seven students when it was annexed to the city.  Nellie Lynch was the first teacher after it was annexed to the city.
Fiskville School was sometimes referred to as the Whitlock Street School.  One of the better known teachers who taught at Fiskville was Laura Hose, who taught there from 1913-1914 until 1921-1922.  The school was closed after the 1923-1924 school (year) and the students were bused to the Horace Mann School.  V. Pittman and Mabel Glover were the last two teachers at the Fiskville School.



  Highland School

Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
In the fall of 1910 Highland School became part of the Crawfordsville School Corporation.  Up until it has been out in the township school district, but the city annexed that area and Highland School became part of the city.  As a township school grades one through were enrolled, but the city only enrolled students in grades one throught four.  It was located on the southeast side of town what is now South MIll Street.  It was named Highland School becaues it stood on the highest ground in the area.  Helen Knigery was the first teacher to teach at Highland School after it became part of the city.
The building was used as a school until 1923-1924 school year, when it was closed and abandoned.  Rose B. Miller was the last teacher to teach at Highland School.
from another area of the book came this paragraph, the right hand edge was missing:
In 1910 two township schools -- Highland and Fiskville -- were added to the city scho(ols) by annexation.  High Grade School xxxxed on South Mill Street.  Highland addit(???) designated because it was a higher par(t of the) city, reached via Danville Avenue.  At t(he time?) these schools were built, both areas wer(e "in) the country" or out in the township.  Wh(en) Highland School was abandoned studen(ts went to) Tuttle Grade School.  The Highland Buildi(ng has) since been demolished.



Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
In 1957 another grade School was built on south Elm Street, north of the Mollie B. Hoover Athletic Field.  It was also named Mollie B. Hoover, a noted Crawfordsville school teacher and land owner.  The original school contained four rooms for K-1-2-3.  In 1960, an addition was made to accommodate the students from Tuttle Grade School which was torn down to make room for the new junior high school.  Another addition was made to Hoover School in 1964.

  • Opening Day 1954 (newspaper clipings probably "Journal-Review" Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
  • Hoover School Photos May 25, 2020 taken by Jim Zach, thanks Jim


The school was located on the southwest corner of Spring and North Walnut Streets

Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
The abandoned 1881 Lincoln School Building was renovated and renamed Horace Mann School, then reopened for both blacks and whites.  Horace Mann operated smoothly for many years and after newer schools were built, it was demolished in 1964.

  • (May 1, 2020) Lincoln/Horace Mann School  just north of the former Shaver Hatchery and current NAPA Auto Parts Store.  Thanks to the CDPL Archives
  • Class of Students with Teacher  -  Sorry no Names, about the mid 1940's  (thanks to CDPL for this one)
  • Opening Day 1954 (newspaper clipings probably "Journal-Review" Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000



Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
In 1954, two new grade schools of six rooms each were built.  One was located north of Fairview Avenue, Park Avenue being extended on the west.  The school was named Laura G. Hose School after a beloved Crawfordsville grade school teacher.  Additions were made in 1960 and 1964.
And the rest of the story:
Laura Hose Elementary School was opened late in the fall of 1954.  It was named after a lady who had taught many years in the Crawfordsville School system.

During the first year Hose served grades K-6.  The school board members were Hugo Prince, Gregory Lane, Helen Harvey, Robert Hunt and Dale Davis.  Lee Eve was the Superintendent and Ralph Worley was the first principal.  James Mize served as the assistant principal and was the sixth grade teacher.  Other teachers included Helen Allhands, Jean Welsh, Ethel Blake, Mary Jane Chesterson, Marjorie Cox, Thelma Karg, and Virginia Taylor was kindergarten teacher.

There have beena number of additions to the building.  The largest addition and remodeling project was completed during the 1999-2000 school year.  The building is now air conditioned, and has special facilities for handicapped student as well as music, art, and a media center.

There have only been five principals at Hose School from 1954 to 2000.  They are Ralph Worley, Charles Arvin, Ray Lutz, Don Whitecotton and John Tidd.



 Miss Hovey's School for girls - sure would like to have pics, lists of who went there, etc. - WOW



 John Beard School

Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
At the begining of the 1916-1917 school year a new school was opended.  It was named John Beard School after a Wabash College educator.  It was located on the east side of the city to accommodate those students living in the area who had to cross busy railroad tracks to get to WillsonSchool.  Christine Pugh taught grades one-four and Lulu Schwin was the Kindergarten teacher.

An addition was made to the school in 1957.  in 1964 the older part of the building was demolished and a new addition was constructed.  It continued to be used as an elementary school until the 1998-99 school year when it only served grades 3-5 and housed the Even Start Program.  After the 1998-99 school year it was used the house the Even Start program and the Adult Education Program.  The children were transferred to Hose School.

More of the Story:

In 1916, after school patrons petitioned in 1912 for a school in the area east of the Vandalia Railroad, a building was completed and named John Beard School.  It was one-story with a basment.  Two rooms on the first floor and two in the basement with water closets were deemed adequate for the children in that area.

In the 1950s and 1960s more additions were made to the original Beard school building on Spann Avenue.  The school was named for Crawfordsville citizen, John Beard, an experienced legislator who served about twenty-five years, mostly in the state Senate.  He introduced a bill for Free Schools, which passed both houses of the Indiana Legislature in 1834.  As this idea passed from state to state, John Beard was acknowledge as the founder of Free Schools in the whole United States.

  • A photo of the early John Beard School   courtesy of Bill Boone
  • Opening Day 1954 (newspaper clipings probably "Journal-Review" Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
  • John Beard today, 20 years after the last class, May 24, 2020  - photos by jim Zach



  Lee School

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana 7 November 1874 p 1 – A lady teacher at the Lee School house is creating dissatisfaction by opening her school day with prayers.
Note: We have not found anymore information on this school and have no idea where it was located other than in Montgomery County.  Charles Arvin's Books do not go this early.


  Lincoln School

Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
Lincoln School was opened in September 1882 with forty-two students.  The lot was purchased in September 1881 for the sum of two thousand dollars and on December 3, 1881 a contract was let to Hinkley and Norris to erect a new school building.  The building cost six thousand four hundred dollars.  It was a red brick structure located in the northern part of the city on Walnut Street, north of Market Street.  The school was built exclusively for colored children.  It was a plain two-story building, with ample room and playgrounds for all of the colored children that resided in the area.

In later years the Lincoln School was move to a new school on east Wabash because most of the colored families has moved to that area.  The new school was not quite finishedin time for school to begin, so a tin temporary building was erected.  It was referred to as the "Tin School"

The old Lincoln School was remodeled and room was added on to serve more children.  Mills school had become overcrowded and some students were transferred to the new school which was named Horace Mann School.  Horace Mann School became somewhat unnecessary when the new Nicholson School and Hose School were opened in 1954.  It was abandoned at the end of the 1957-1958 school (year).  It was demolished in the 1960's.
From a different section of the book:
Since all students went to Central School after 1873, by 1880 the school was over-crowded.  Increased numbers of black students necessitated the renting of "Old Center Church" for them.  In 1881 it was ordered that a school for black students be built at the southwest corner of Spring and North Walnut streets, which became Lincoln School.  The site was selected because most of the black families lived in the north part of town.

In 1922, with more whites living in the north part of the city and the blacks moving to the east side, the original Lincoln School was abandoned and a new Lincoln School was built on east Wabash Avenue.  It accommondated black students in eight grades.  It was used several years, then abandoned as a school building.  Students attended neighborhood schools in the district and the 7th and 8th graders went to the high school, which included grades 7-12.  The Lincoln Building became a recreation center for the black population and a meeting place fot the Mason's Lodge and the Baptist Church.  It was demolished in 1981.

The abandone 1881 Lincoln School Building was renovated and renamed Horace Mann School, then reopened for both blacks and whites.  Horace Mann operated smoothly for many years and after newer schools were built, it was demolished in 1964.







   Caleb Mills School (link shows historic Mills School)

Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
This building was situated on West Main Street.  On August 19, 1881, a lot was purchased for one thousand three hundred thirty three dollars, and a contract was awarded on August 29, 1887 to build a school.  This building was named after Caleb Mills an educator who had accomplished so much for the public school system in Indiana.  The out of doors features of this building consisted of ample play grounds with swings, bars, etc. all of which was added by the school board in 1908, the money generously given by the Crawfordsville Journal.  A new heating plant was also added at that time, with excellant weather-strips for each window.

This building was used until 1964 when the present structure was erected.  The building was used as an elementary school until the 1994-95 school year.  That year is was used for the Kdgn. Class and for the even start program.  In 1995-96 the bui8lding was used for the "Even Start" and adult education programs.  Presently it is used as office space for the West Central Special Education Cooperative.
More of the story:
In 1887 two members of the School Board were instructed to go to Fort Wayne to examine school buildings "tomeet the needs of Crawfordsville."  Plans of Wayne Schoolhouse then were adopted for the "New Ward School" to be buiult on property which had already been purchased between Main Street and West Pike Streetin the 800 block, with alleys on the west and east.  This structure was named after Caleb MIlls, a professor at Wabash College, who was responsible for creating a public school system in Indiana.Mills School was the oldest ward school in the city.  Although it housed grades K_5, it was torn down, and a new school built to accommodate grades K-3, so that younger children in that section of the city would no have to go to a larger school many blocks away.  The old Mills School faced Main; the new Mills faces Pike Street.

  • Opening Day 1954 (newspaper clipings probably "Journal-Review" Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
  • Caleb Mills School retired  In use by the Youth Service Bureau, May 25, 2020.  Photos by Jim Zach.




Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
Meredith Nicholson School was opened in the fall of 1954.  It was named after a rather famous Indiana author, Meredith Nicholson.  It is located on Lane Avenue.

The members of the board of Education were Hugo Prince, Gregory Lane, Helen Harvey, Robert Hunt and Dale Davis.  The superintendant was Lee Eve and the first principal was Okel Hesler.  The teachers were Flora Wilson (AST's Principal and fifth grade teacher), Donald Houston, Dorothy Ross, Emma Jean Walters, Martha Pearson, Mary Ogle and Virginia Taylor (Kdgn teacher).

There have been a number of additions to Nicholson School.  During the 1999-2000 a major remodeling project was completed.  For the first time the elementary schools were air conditioned and had special rooms designed as a media center, art and music.
Another Note from another page:
In 1954, two new grade schools of six rooms each were built.One was Laura G. Hose and the other was Meredith Nicholson.  It was located on Lane Avenue northeast of the intersection with Wayne Avenue.  Additions were also made to this school in  1960 and 1964.



  Normal - at Whitlock

Source: Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana Star newspaper July 21, 1887 p 5 “Whitlock News” – Our Normal is still booming. Our Normal has a large attendance. The Normal is the beginning of a new era in the educational interests of our community and our citizens all appreciate that.
Item of Note:  This school may have become known as the "Fiskville School" which was annexed in 1910 into Crawfordsville.



 Saint Bernard




  SAINT CHARLES

  • (June 30, 2020) Source: Crawfordsville Star 6 Sept 1877 p 1
    St. Charles Academy opened in regular, fall session on Monday morning. The corps of instructors are nearly all from abroad.
  • 1952 Fire Destroy's Saint Charles  (thanks Jeff McKinney) - an absolutely amazing shot




  Tuttle Elementary School

Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
The construction of the Tuttle Elementary School began in the autumn of 1905, and superintendant Millis laid the first brick on November 2, 1905. The school was opened November 7, 1906.  It was located on South Elm Street and was named after Joseph Tuttle who was an educator and president of Wabasg College.

The newspaper reported that modern heating, lighting, and ventilation were special features of the building.  There were eight recitation rooms with light coming in from the north windows.  The furnishings and decorations were idesl and truly artistic.  In 1911 there were seven teachers presiding over three hundred students.  The building was designed and built by W. F. Sharp and cost twenty thousand dollars.  It had a slate roof and was consideredto be a fireproof buiulding.

The schoolboard members were Thomas T. Munhall, president, Warren H. Ristine, Secretary, and Moreland Binford, Treasurer.  William Millis was the superintendant, and Frank D. McElroy was the principal as well as the sixth grade teacher.  Clara Brockman, Beller Moore, Mae McIntrye, Helen O'Neall, and Clara Calvin were the teachers.

The building was used as an elementary school until 1958.  The building was demplished and construction began on a new Junior High School.  The last faculty at mTuttle Elementary included Clyde Gentry as Principal, Richard Whitworth, James Foster, Janet Holloway, Maude Warbington, Betty Ellis, Ellen Luse, Mary Rich, Maude Foster, and Beatrice Cook.

In 1958-1959-the students were transferre to Willson and a new Mollie B. Hoover School.  In 1961 the new Tuttle Junior High School, serving gradews 7-9 was opened.  Dr, Mark Caress was the superintendant and Donald R. Golliher was the first principal.  James Rady served as the assistant principal.  Later the ninth grade was moved to the High School and the sizxth grade was moved to Tuttle.  Itis used as a middle school as we enter the 21st entury.

  • Tuttle lower corridor inside school  Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
  • Tuttle-Lincoln Soccer Game
  • Opening Day 1954 (newspaper clipings probably "Journal-Review" Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
  • Tuttle School - 1957 - thanks so very much to Colin Thompson for this one :) This is one nifty picture and seems to be right as they were getting ready to tear it down - now, the one replacing it is being torn down. I know progress but I don't like progress some times :( kbz
  • View of the SchoolHigh



In 1961 the new Tuttle Junior High School, serving gradews 7-9 was opened.  Dr, Mark Caress was the superintendant and Donald R. Golliher was the first principal.  James Rady served as the assistant principal.  Later the ninth grade was moved to the High School and the sizxth grade was moved to Tuttle.  It is used as a middle school as we enter the 21st entury.  Michael Hinkle replaced James Rady as assistant principal in the 1965-1966 school year.  He served there until 1969, when he replaced Donald Golliher as principal.

Around 2015-16 Tuttle Middle School was razed to make way for Crawfordsville Middle School.

  Union Township



  Unknown Photos -- PLEASE help Identify :) THANKS



(besides the historical things below, you might enjoy visiting the current Wabash College Website)





-- Wabash College Album --

Thanks to Bill Boone for many of these nifty 'ol photos (and post cards)






Wabash College was founded on November 21, 1832. According to early records, the next day a group of the men chosen as trustees of the college knelt in the snow and conducted a dedication service. The college would be located in the frontier town of Crawfordsville, Indiana, with the resolve "that the institution be at first a classical and English high school, rising into a college as soon as the wants of the country demand."



The first faculty member of Wabash was Caleb Mills, a graduate of Dartmouth College and Andover Seminary, who arrived in 1833 and immediately established the character of the school. As noted by Byron Trippet, who was associated with Wabash College for forty years as student, teacher, dean, and president, "by his ideals, his vision, and his abundant energy [Caleb Mills] gave to this college a sense of mission, which it has occasionally neglected, but has never completely lost." Caleb Mills later became the father of the Indiana public school system and worked tirelessly to improve education in the entire Mississippi Valley. Each fall, Caleb Mills' bell is used to "ring in" the freshman class as students of Wabash College, and each spring the bell "rings out" that year's class of Wabash men as they move on to new challenges.



Campus

The 60-acre wooded campus contains 25 buildings predominantly of Georgian architecture. Caleb Mills taught the first class of Wabash students in 1833 in Forest Hall, located since 1965 at the north end of campus and now home to the Teacher Education Department. Built in 1836, Caleb Mills' House hosts various college functions. Also built in 1836, Hovey Cottage, home to the College's second faculty member Edmund O. Hovey, houses the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion. The College dedicated the newly expanded and renovated Fine Arts Center in 1993. The Detchon Center for Modern Languages and International Studies, housed in an expanded and renovated campus landmark built in 1893, is a state-of-the-art facility. During the Campaign for Leadership, Wabash built Hays Hall, the $30 million home of the biology and chemistry departments; renovated Goodrich Hall, which is home to the mathematics and physics departments; built a $2 million Malcolm X Institute for Black Studies; and built the $20 million Allen Athletics and Recreation Center.

Wabash College has always been independent and non-sectarian, although its founders and Caleb Mills were Presbyterian ministers. The school was patterned after the conservative liberal arts colleges of New England, with their high standards. Caleb Mills declared the aims of the college to be learning, virtue, and service.



"OLD WABASH!"

Words by Edwin Meade Robinson, 1900

Music by Carroll Ragan, 1901

From the hills of Maine to the western plain, or where the cotton is blowing; From the gloomy shade of the northern pine, to the light of the southern seas; There's a name held dear and a color we cheer wherever we find it glowing; And the tears will rise to our longing eyes as it floats on the evening breeze.

When the day is done and the western sun is painting in flashing glory; Across the skies with gorgeous dyes the color we love so well; We love to sit as the shadows flit and praise it in song and story; We love to shout as the light dies out a good old Wabash yell.

Our prayers are always thine, our voices and hearts combine, To sing thy praise when future days shall bring thy name before us. When college days are past, as long as life shall last, Our greatest joy will be to shout the chorus.

Dear Old Wabash, thy loyal sons shall ever love thee, And o'er thy classic halls, the Scarlet flag shall proudly flash. Long in our hearts, we'll bear the sweetest mem'ries of thee, Long shall we sing thy praises, Old Wabash!



Below we have a slide show album containing many collected photos of trivia associated with Wabash items. Along with some older campus photos and older post cards of the campus, many supplied by Wabash alumni Bill Boone. The website management appreciates all the contributions provided for use here.


   WILLSON School

Historical:
Source: "Crawfordsville High School/Union Township"", prepared by Charles L. Arvin, April 2000
In 1884 the school board presented a statement to the mayor and Common Council requestingadditional grounds and buildings because of continued over-crowsing at the Central School.  Mrs. Samuel Willson offered her home for use as a ward school.  The large, square, red-brick house set in an ample and shady yard offered sufficient room for six grades.

In 1897 the Willson School, resembling a fortress, was builkt on the Willson property, located in the 600 block of East Wabash Avenue, bounded on the west by Plum Street (now Wallace Avenue) and on the south by Jefferson Street.

Willson School was demolished in 1964 and a new school, named Anna Willson, was erected on the site facing Jefferson Street.  Anna Willison was a beloved teacher who was pricipal of the high school and later superintendant Crawfordsville School system.  She was a grand-daughter of Sanuel Willson.
More of the Story:
The original Willson School building was erected in 1897 at a cost of only twenty thousand nine hundred and eighty two dollars.  The school board members were N. C. Carr, President, J. C. Barnhill, treasurer, and Dr. E. H. Cowan secretary.  G. F. Kennaston was the superimtendant and Anna Sibbett was the first principal.

The newspaper reported that the schoolwas located near the historic home of General Lew Wallace, with a handsome lawn and had bright cheery walls and recitation rooms.  In 1911 there were three hundred and fifty six students attending the school in grades one through six, and eight competent teachers taught them.

Three hundred dollars in swings, made of steele, traveling rings, giant  strides, ladders, see-saws, basketball courts and a hundredyard cinder running track made the grounds on of the best.  The beauty of the building and yard may be judged by the fact that the "Art Work of Central Indiana" included it as being the school building worthy of a place on its pages.

The original building was used as an elementary school until 1964 when it was replaced by a new one-story building.  The new building was used for grades K-6 until the 1995-1996 school year.  Since the 1996-97 school year it has served as the Kindergarten Center and has been used for that purpose through 2000-2001. (As of this Writing)





NOTE: I and many others have spent 20 plus years (from its inception) on this project --
CREDITPLEASE GIVE if you use our work! I've found hundreds of obituaries FROM THIS SITE on findagrave and many personal genealogy sites - I know the obituaries etc. came from here but I don't see any credit. PLEASE GIVE CREDIT!!!! Here is the citation you should use & thanks so much in advance :)

Citation: The Indiana (INGenWeb Project), Copyright ©1996-2019 (and beyond), Montgomery County GenWeb site http://www.ingenweb.org/inmontgomery/ - thanks soooo much - Karen Bazzani Zach

My name is Karen Bazzani Zach and I am your Coordinator for Montgomery County.    My hubby is constantly helping me as well - thanks, Jim Z :) . Your Indiana State Coordinator is Lena Harper .  Her assistant state coordinators are : Jim Cox and Karen Bazzani Zach

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