SPINNING, William - Fountain County INGenWeb Project

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SPINNING, William

Source: Weekly Argus News, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana April 23, 1898 p 3

William Spinning, a resident of Wallace and one of the most prominent men of affairs in this section of the state died unexpectedly last week at his home. For nearly a year past he had been in ill health and a number of times during the fall his life was despaired of but he rallied and was apparently on the high road of recovery. Only a few weeks ago he was in Crawfordsville and spoke hopefully of returning health. His demise was due to heart trouble with complications. William Spinning was 56 years of age and was born in Ohio but at a tender age he came with his parents to Indiana and the greater portion of his life has been spent in this vicinity. He was a strikingly handsome man, of great physical strength and as courageous as he was strong. His bluff but hearty disposition took well with his neighbors and he commanded the admiration and respect of all. Mr. Spinning served gallantly in the late war as a member of the 63rd Ind. Volunteers. The greater portion of the time since the war he was engaged in the drug business in his town. He was at one time deputy sheriff of Fountain County and it was he, who was called upon by Sheriff Musser of Parke County at the time of the Buck Stout execution to pull the trap that launched Taylor Dunbar's murderer into eternity. Mr. Spinning leaves a wife and five children: Dr. Spinning a physician at the Michigan City penitentiary; and Ed Spinning a guard in the same institution; Guy Spinning a school teacher of Wallace and Misses Lizzie and Ura. The funeral occurred at Covington Sunday   -- typed by kbz


Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal Friday, 22 April, 1898

Wm H. Spinning died last Friday at his home, just north of Wallace, in Fountain County. Mr. Spinning had been suffering for several years with the dropsy but had been able to be about a major portion of the time. He was one of the leading citizens of Fountain County and in his neighborhood was almost supreme for many years. Hundreds of people came to him for advice on matters of all kinds and he stood to the country side in the relation of guide, philosopher and friend. He was a stalwart republican and he always made his influence felt in a campaign. Mr. Spinning was an all around good citizen and was a man who commanded respect wherever he appeared. He was strikingly handsome and when he was away from home people naturally gave him a second look. He leaves a family of three sons and two daughters. One of his sons, Dr. Alvah Spinning, is the physician at the prison north.

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